gantries move towers don’t

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    5,407 Elga2048

    elga just thinking, if gantry for assembly rocket, meanwhile launch tower for fill rocket fuel before launch, installed on rocket mobile launch pad. sorry, if wrong 😅

    1.4 years ago
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    210 Toinkove

    http://apollolaunchcontrol.com/v20test/http_www.apollolaunchcontrol.com/MobileService_Structure.html

    in case you havn't seen this! it's not well featured structure of the Apollo program but it was used for every moon mission

    1.5 years ago
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    210 Toinkove

    I was just pointing out the various nuances in different systems.

    The Saturn V ‘launch tower’ was fixed to the mobile launch platform (MLP) but the MLP itself moved (via the crawler-transporter) so in a sense so did the tower every time the MLP was moved to and from the Vehicle Assembly Building.

    The Saturn V Mobile Service Structure on the other hand was more like what you described as a ‘gantry’ and was stored about 7000 feet away from the pad and then moved into place (via the same crawler-transport) next to the Saturn V, MLP & launch tower after they were in place on the pad.

    The Space Shuttle ‘launch tower’ however was built into to the pad and never moved from that location. The Mobile Service structure was also built into the pad but had one end on rails I believe allowing it to swing around next to the orbiter for servicing.

    The Delta IV has a launch tower that is built into to the pad and a mobile service structure that rolls back about 300 feet before launch.

    You’re absolutely correct that gantry is a movable structure that supports rocket launches which moves out of the way before launch. I was just pondering how movable does it have to be to be a gantry. Would the space shuttles mobile service structure be considered that? Truth is I’ve not really heard the term gantry used since the 60’s. instead I’m more accustomed to the terms “fixed service structure” and “mobile service structure”.

    1.5 years ago
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    1,159 YaMomzBox420

    @Toinkove confused look

    But the launch towers are built into the launchpad facilities used for them. The tower itself doesn't move. You must be talking about the massive transport vehicle that moved those LVs to the pad and functionally served as the bottom of the pad as well

    +1 1.5 years ago
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    @Toinkove @YaMomzBox420
    nice

    1.5 years ago
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    210 Toinkove

    I seem to recall the Saturn V having a mobile service structure that rolled away to a storage pad near the junction of the crawlerway leading to both pads. And the space shuttle also had a mobile service structure but I don’t know if either one were ever referred to as a “gantry”

    1.5 years ago
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    1,159 YaMomzBox420

    A launch tower is stationary, while a gantry moves out of the way. Systems like the Saturn V and Space Shuttle used launch towers(although the quick disconnect systems are technically just small gantries). Soyuz on the other hand uses a wraparound gantry tower that opens from the top like a flower immediately after ignition. A lot of smaller rockets use gantries too. I'm not sure exactly why one system is chosen over the other for different applications, but I'm sure it boils down to economics and the reliability of the rocket in question.

    +1 1.5 years ago

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